Changing a broken jewel

Discussion in 'Other Watch Brands' started by Archer, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. SSD

    SSD

    Premium Member
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Points:
    5,274
    Posts:
    4,931
    Likes:
    0
    That is quite interesting Al, I enjoyed the pics a lot. I didn't know there were other colors available...
  2. Archer

    Archer

    Silver Member
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Points:
    38
    Posts:
    3,316
    Likes:
    2
    Most jewels are red, but colourless jewels are also quite common. Blue is pretty rare, but I've seen a few others in addition to the one on the Zenith.

    Most jewels are synthetic ruby but there are a few cases on some old pocket watches where they use a diamond for the cap jewel on the balance - this is on the higher grade watches.

    For old pocket watches (Waltham, Hamilton, Elgin, etc.) one of the challenges when replacing a jewel is matching the colour properly. I have a decent stock of old rubbed in jewels, and they tend to be much more variable in how red they are than modern jewels are. These older jewels range from almost colourless, through light pink, then right to deep red. Modern jewels are usually very uniform deep red. If you are doing a proper repair on a vintage pocket watch or wrist watch, and the company has gone to the trouble to match all the jewels, then you want to do the same when you replace one.

    Cheers, Al
  3. Kordaat

    Kordaat

    TKF Newbie
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2017
    Points:
    0
    Posts:
    1
    Likes:
    0
    Life long learning (especially with watches)


    Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk