Omega Co-axial Training Completed!

Discussion in 'Omega Watches' started by Archer, May 28, 2012.

  1. Archer

    Archer

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    Well I'm back from a week in lovely Secaucus, New Jersey at the Swatch Service Center. I attended their Service Provider Training, which was primarily focused on the servicing of the Omega co-axial movements.

    It was a busy week, with two watches on the schedule - a 2500C based Omega Seamaster AT shown here:

    [​IMG]

    And once that was done, I had a Planet Ocean Chronograph to service, with the Cal 3313C:

    [​IMG]

    Both were delivered as complete watches, and had to be completely torn down, cleaned, luibricated, and assembled back to full watches. Of course we had quite a lot of theory, and then practiced lubricating the co-axial escapement under a microscope several times to get the hang of it.

    Here are a couple of videos I took there of a model that show the difference between a Swiss lever escapement, and the co-axial.

    This is the Swiss lever:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q370Mne4Aw&hd=1

    And this is the co-axial, at least one version of it:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWZvBBkZDpQ&hd=1

    Anyway, I'll post more on this later but I have a lot of catching up to do after a week away from the bench!

    If you guys have any questions on the co-axial, let me know and I'll do my best to answer.

    Cheers, Al
    SabrWolf likes this.
  2. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    Welcome back, Al! :cheers: Looks like you've been having fun. :thumbsup:
  3. pawnshopkiller

    pawnshopkiller

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    Awesome.
  4. Archer

    Archer

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    Disassembly of the 2500C:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Movement mounted in the control holder for checking the functions of the escapement:

    [​IMG]

    Oiling under the microscope:

    [​IMG]

    There are 30 individual oiling points on this two level escapement.....it's a little time consuming to say the least. I need to get one of these:

    [​IMG]

    This one is done and ready for the test winder:

    [​IMG]

    Cheers, Al
  5. Carl

    Carl

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    :goodpost: Thanks, Al! What an intense training that must have been.
    The old cliche "A picture is worth 1000 words" does really apply with those two videos. Thanks for posting the links.
    I understand, speaking of the 2500C Coaxial movement, that there has been an enhancement to the movement. At least, on my new SMP, I understand it is now called the 2500D, and I guess all of the newer Omegas which come with the 2500. I imagine that was covered as well. If you care to elaborate a bit, it would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers :cheers:
    Carl
  6. Kiwi

    Kiwi

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    Wow, that is intense:worship:

    Thanks for showing, Al:goodpost:
  7. Marrk

    Marrk

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    Marvelous. :thumbsup: I'm reading with interest. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
  8. Archer

    Archer

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    I'll answer Carl's questions and show a bit of the chronograph, as the 3313C is fitted with the same design in the co-axial as the 2500D is.

    The 2500 A, B, and C are fitted with the two level co-axial escepement design, which is a design that was used to fit it into an existing movement, the Omega Cal. 1120 (based on an ETA 2892A2). This was Daniels "extra flat" design, and one that if I recall correctly he made when he pitched the co-axial to Patek. This had a few issues along the way, and in fact if you have an A version, hang onto it, because they are pretty rare now. Most were swapped for B's because they had an issue with the pallet bridge that would cause stopping after a shock.

    The B and C had a few different changes, such as beat rate, mainspring length, and some change in materials in the escapement. They are all still the two level co-axial though. The D version, along with the 3313, 8500, and all other new co-axials are three level co-axials. This means there are three different levels of teeth on the co-axial wheel instead of two levels of teeth. It is more true to the original Daniels design (although he did design both versions) and it makes the movement thicker, so this requires several other modifications to make it work in the 2500.

    So the three level co-axial solves a few of the technical problems that the two level has. This is related to the shape of the teeth on the wheel, so fewer teeth need lubrication.

    Here is an image of the two level co-axial wheel:

    [​IMG]

    And here is the 3 level co-axial wheel:

    [​IMG]

    On the 3 level design, only 10 points need oiling rather than 30.


    So here is the chronograph disassembled:

    [​IMG]

    Here the base movement is back together:

    [​IMG]

    Here is the oiling of the co-axial wheel under the microscope. If you compare it to the other photo of the two level wheel, you can see the shape of the teeth is much different - this is oiling the same lower co-axial tooth that the other photo shows, so very different designs. Note that you can see a small wedge of oil between the tooth and the jewel where the tooth contacts - this is the max oil allowed, so the oiling here is about a precise a task any anything I've done in watchmaking to date:

    [​IMG]

    To put the scale into perspective, I've cropped a photo of the parts tray from above to point out the co-axial wheel, and the pallet fork with red arrows. As you can see, it's a very small wheel to begin with:

    [​IMG]

    Here the movement is back together and the dial/hands have been installed:

    [​IMG]

    I had to pop the bezel insert out as it did not align properly to the 12 o-clock mark:

    [​IMG]

    Pressing the insert back in - aligned now:

    [​IMG]

    Both watches I worked on completed:

    [​IMG]

    Hope this helps explain some of the differences.

    Cheers, Al
    SabrWolf and SWV like this.
  9. marcus f

    marcus f

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    Al, yet again what a great thread :thumbsup:
  10. Rigsby

    Rigsby

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    Excellent pictures, thanks for sharing Al. :thumbsup:
  11. G.J.

    G.J.

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    Fantastic thread Al..!!!

    Thanks:thumbsup:
  12. karmatp

    karmatp

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    That was super interesting Al, thanks so much for taking the time and posting.

    I wish you lived in my local area, it would be great to have a watchmaker like you near by.
  13. Archer

    Archer

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    Glad you enjoyed it - just so you know I service watches from all over. I have one in my shop right now from AZ, and others from TX, NY, OR, VA, SC, PA, etc....and of course from all over Canada as well.

    Cheers, Al
  14. Archer

    Archer

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    I have answered your pm Gerard. Cheers!
  15. Cmaster03

    Cmaster03

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    +1.
  16. Carl

    Carl

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    Thanks so much Al!

    :worship: Better than anything I have read or seen yet, your post explains this so well. I shall hang on to it for future reference. My memory is so bad, I need to keep going back to these things!
    My SMP with the 2500D appears to be very accurate. Matter of fact, the most accurate of any Omega I have had so far, at least COSC rated, and not including the Speedy.
    My AT 8500 that I had briefly, just after the new model came out, was not terribly accurate. My SMP with the 1120 ETA based movement, was the most accurate until I got the new SMP and Speedy.
    I really appreciate - as we all do - your taking the time to put together such an informative description.
    :goodpost:

    Cheers :cheers:
    Carl
  17. Archer

    Archer

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    Thanks Carl - glad you enjoyed it.

    Cheers, Al
  18. KZ1000

    KZ1000

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    Way to go Al! I remember when you were just getting started as a watchmaker. You sure have progressed well, keep up the good work and posts!
  19. SLRdude

    SLRdude

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    Good to see you around Jeff!
  20. KZ1000

    KZ1000

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    Thanks! Good to see you as well :thumbsup: I kept getting those email reminders making me feel guilty for not being around :cheers: