Omega Link Removal

Discussion in 'Omega Watches' started by RW16610, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. RW16610

    RW16610

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    Well I might be getting the other 1/2 size link removed from my new Planet Ocean. The only draw back to this style bracelet in my books is the fact you can not just use a jewellers screw driver to adjust it yourself. Some of the new Omega models though do have the screws in the bracelet for asjusting those links.

    Anyways, instead of paying an AD or store a few dollars to do it once this is my plan, buy the special Omega bracelet tool and do it myself in the future if any further adjusting is needed. Here is a look at one:


    [​IMG]
    Source on picture



    This site has the step by step instructions on what to do also:


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    "This watch bracelet tool is is so simple to use, in fact, that even with my total lack of manual dexterity, I managed to re-size a bracelet like a pro on the first try. An amazing little tool for removing press-fit pins in links to size bracelets.

    It's easier if you take one end of the bracelet off the watch first. Push the pins out in the direction of the arrows on the bracelet by lining up the drift pin and turning the screw.

    The bracelet illistrated below is from an Omega Seamaster





    In the center section, there is a locking sleeve. Notice it is has a notch close to each end. This corresponds with a crimp in ONE end of the pin. When you insert the pin back into the bracelet, aligning the holes, make sure the crimp end of the pin goes in last. This means the crimp doesn't have to push through two of the notches in the sleeve.



    Make sure you push the pin back in in the opposite direction of the arrows. Push the pin in with a hard surface, making sure you align all the holes. I usually use the tool to recess the pin going back in. This is a little tricky, because the drift pin wants to slide off the end of the bracelet pin. Be carefull here if you don't want to make any marks on you links.

    It's pretty easy with this bracelet, but much harder with the older style "Bond" bracelet, which has two shorter locking sleeves and more holes to align and push through.

    Addendums

    to change the pins in the tool:

    1. Unscrew the part with the pin from the base

    2. Hold that in one hand - by the knurled part

    3. In the other hand take a pair of pliers or vice grips - with that tool grasp the base of the pin.

    4. Twist the tool holding the pin tightly clockwise and counter clockwise

    5. At the same time be pulling the pin out of the piece with the knurled nob holding the pin.

    6. Install a new pin via the reverse process

    A brilliant idea from Dale T. He suggests reversing the pin pusher in the threaded holder of the tool and using the "blunt" end to help seat the pin in the bracelet. By doing this it's easy to push the pin all the way up to the edge of the bracelet and not scratch the bracelet. Then, says Dale, simply reverse the pin pusher in the holder to it's original configuration and "seat" the pin the correct distance in the bracelet.
    From talking with customers, different watch manufacturers use different systems for the push pins in their bracelets.
    Some watch bracelets have just the pin holding the links together and the pins are held in place by the deisgn of the pin and friction alone. This is the case with Titoni bracelets, for example.
    BUT some manufacturer's use tiny bushings in the links that hold the pins firmly in place. This is apparently the case with some Citizen and Hamilton bracelets, for example.
    As a result, I strongly suggest you work over a clean white surface when you remove a link and pin you can find the bushing/s -- just in case your bracelet uses that system.

    I am sorry, I do not know which bracelets use bushings in combination with the pins in their bracelets"


    http://www.mywatchmaker.net/epages/sizingbracelets.htm


    Have to start hunting for one. Did not search eBay or anything yet, of course. If any forum members have any for sale let me know. Do not like to buy stuff off random websites persoanlly.
  2. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    :goodpost: Rommel! Very informative! :thumbsup:
  3. RW16610

    RW16610

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    :thankyou: I hope it helps some people who have or might eventually have an Omega. I have sized watches myself in the past but was not too sure how this system worked so this article was a big help. Now all I need to do is find a tool but that should be simple :rocker:
  4. daveathall

    daveathall

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    Great info and thread Rommel, thank you for posting it for us.
  5. Goldbug

    Goldbug

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    Good information. Hope you find this tool so you can do the work yourself.


    John
  6. SPACE-DWELLER

    SPACE-DWELLER

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    GREAT stuff, Rommel! :goodpost:

    Thanks for sharing! :cheers:
  7. RW16610

    RW16610

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    Glad you all liked it. Later today when time allows I will start searching ebay for one and let you know what happens :cheers:
  8. SPACE-DWELLER

    SPACE-DWELLER

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    Stickied. :cheers:
  9. RW16610

    RW16610

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    :coolanimated: :rocker: Hope this topic helps some folks. I guess the one advantage of this system is you do not get the screws gradually coming out on their own (not a common problem,at all). My Raymond Weil had that issue for 2 screws in the bracelet :banghead: At the time did not want to use tread lock or send it for repairs so kept a jewellers screw driver handy. As the bracelet moves when you wear it or remove it daily the screw would turn with the link and would become loose. One day I was outside and caught it just in time, was almost all the way out! :yikes: My Fortis though the way the screws are set up it never gave me that problem, ever. When the bracelet moves the screws stay put and the link moves around it, kind of as if it has a bearing or enough space.
  10. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    A well deserved sticky! :thumbsup:
  11. carbon6

    carbon6

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  12. RW16610

    RW16610

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    Oh cool :coolanimated: I will have to check that out in a bit. Still did not get a chance to search eBay yet either :laugh:
  13. carbon6

    carbon6

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    I've ordered stuff from Otto Frei before. When using that Link Pin Remover tool, do it nice and slow being careful not to snap the extractor pin. It also works well with my Tag bracelet.
  14. RW16610

    RW16610

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    Oh :coolanimated: I will consider then. Visited the guy who fixed my Fortis in 2007 today to show him my new watch. He wears an Explorer II now. Recently sold a Submariner and has a Daytona for sale. Anyways, asked him to order me one and he said drop by next week and get it. I shall see what happens, would be nice to support a local business (even if it is for something as small as that). Good to know it works with the Tag Heuer too though, that brand might be added to my future collection so that would be awesome if that happnes.

    Either way, I will do my best to take pictures once the tool is here of the process maybe but we shall see :cheers:
  15. LopeyDeath

    LopeyDeath

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    Awesome post. I just bought the tool and will be using it shortly.