Removing Scratches from Speedy Crystal

Discussion in 'Omega Watches' started by k.lange, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. k.lange

    k.lange

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    The crystal on my Speedy is getting pretty scratched up. I can go to my local AD to get it buffed, but they are not close by. Do any of you Speedy owners have any recommendations on DIY buffing? Any reasons not to do it myself?

    I plan to take it to my AD every six months or so, but would like to have a way to handle the scratches in between visits.

    Thanks in advance!
  2. aquajoe

    aquajoe

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    Need to know if its a Hesalite or a sapphire crystal. I forgot what the guys were using for the Hesalite. Some kind of plastic polish. :thinking: the sapphire would have to be replaced.
  3. k.lange

    k.lange

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    It's the Hesalite crystal. I've read about lots of people on the forums using Polywatch. My AD has never heard if it.
  4. aquajoe

    aquajoe

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    Yep. That's it. There's been a couple of guys here polish their Hesalite with that.
  5. k.lange

    k.lange

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    Ok. Thanks for the quick response.
  6. Baco Noir

    Baco Noir

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    I've used polywatch on my Tudor acrylic crystal and it works great. Takes some patience and more force than I expected, but there are YouTube videos on doing it yourself.

    Take before and after shots to show us the results! :thumbsup:
  7. Erwin

    Erwin

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    Polywatch as mentioned works great on acrylic crystals. I used them with my Vintage SMs.
  8. k.lange

    k.lange

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    Thanks guys for the recommendations! I will get some Polywatch and post some pics.
  9. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    Yep, that's the stuff you want. :thumbsup:
  10. Archer

    Archer

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    For refinishing crystals, you can use Polywatch for fine scratches. If the scratches are deep, then you can start with some wet/dry sandpaper. I usually start at 1200 grit. Here is a chronograph I did a while back - first stage looks pretty bad after you remove the deep scratches:

    [​IMG]

    Carry on using progressively finer grades, making sure the marks from the previous grade are all removed before moving on:

    [​IMG]

    Then Polywatch to finish up, and the crystal looks new:

    [​IMG]

    Surprised your dealer has never heard of Polywatch - it's a pretty common thing in the industry...

    Cheers, Al
  11. marcus f

    marcus f

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    Al, you the man :rocker:
  12. k.lange

    k.lange

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    Thanks for the great info and pics Al!

    Most are just fine scratches, but one small section is a bit cloudy. Should I start with sandpaper or with Polywatch and see if that does the trick?

    Yeah I was surprised they didn't know either. They have full service repair staff there, which, along with the 2 yr warranty, is why I was willing to pay a premium on a preowned watch.

    That being said they have been a bit difficult to work with. I stopped by due to the watch running 2 min fast and simply asked what service they had done when they received the watch. They seemed a bit insulted by my question and said they don't keep records of their service work.

    I explained that I had specifically bought the watch under the assumption that they had fully inspected the watch to ensure it had all original parts and was running well. They replied by saying they do inspect and test the watch, but don't do any work on it unless it needs it. They also said that is why they provide a warranty.

    I had them test the watch and got a copy of the results. Based on the results it shouldn't be gaining 2 min after a couple days. I have fixed this myself by setting the watch dial up each night

    My question for you all is whether the AD is providing good service or not? Should they have done a full service cleaning, calibrating, etc when they received the watch? This was what I was lead to believe. I assumed so as I have seen the postings Al does for his service work.

    Sorry for the long post. I'd appreciate any feedback.
  13. carbon6

    carbon6

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    There's seems to be several issues with your local AD.
    1. They have more than one repair person there and none of them have heard of Polywatch. :thinking:
    2. They don't keep records of their service work. :thinking:
    3. Two minutes fast is 1:54 too much. :thinking:
    I don't think they're providing good service and would find another dealer.
  14. ulackfocus

    ulackfocus

    Ooooh, shiny! I want it!
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    Oh, I'd wager they have heard of it - but wouldn't tell a PAYING customer how to do something they can make a few easy bucks on.
  15. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    Yeah, no kidding. He probably had a tube in his back pocket. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
  16. Archer

    Archer

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    The Polywatch would be where I would start - if that does not totally remove the cloudiness, then you can always go back and start again with the sandpaper. Polywatch will do a pretty good job on most minor scratches. Of course you need to be very careful with not rubbing either the sandpaper or the Polywatch on a sruface you don't want polished - I would suggest masking off the bezel/case if you feel that might be a problem.

    Not keeping records of service work is odd. Not everyone does what I do - in fact I don't know of anyone else that does the sort of documentation I do - but still they should have a record of the watch serial number, what work was done, and what parts were replaced. That is pretty standard in the industry and almost the minimum requirement for just running a business.

    I'm not sure what they advertized but if a watch has not exceeded it's recommended service interval, is tested and runs/operates properly, and has no visual signs of needing service, then there would be no reason to service it. However if something does go wrong, then it should be covered under warranty.

    I'm not exactly sure what Speedy you have, but if it is a Speedy Pro, then Omega tolerances are -1 to +11 seconds per day on the Cal. 1861 movement. The allowed Delta is 15 seconds at full wind, and 20 seconds at full wind -24 hours. However this is only measured over 3 positions, as this is not a chronometer certified movement. If you post the timing slip results, I can possibly give you more information on the movement meeting Omega specs or not.

    By the way, for best timekeeping, the watch should be wound every day.

    Cheers, Al
  17. KatGirl

    KatGirl

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    I believe your experience is pretty typical, when buying a pre-owned luxury watch, from a Jeweler. More than likely, they just made sure it was running, and keeping reasonably good time, then polished it, and put it up for sale. They provided a warranty, in case of problems after purchase. For the time to be off that much, no matter the resting position, tells ME, it's overdue for a service. I have bought and sold a lot of watches, and am always struck by ads that say something like, "fully inspected by a watchmaker", which basically means, "it runs". Potential buyers may think this means it's been serviced. ....That's not usually the case, unfortunately ..... The very first pre-owned Speedy Pro, that I purchased from a brick and mortar Jeweler, had a broken mainspring. It ran, but it was broken, which tells me, the Jeweler didn't even open up the watch, to check it out, before listing it for sale. I'd demand a complete movement service, under the dealer's warranty. Good luck.
  18. Archer

    Archer

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    If the watch is really running 2 minutes fast per day (that's not clear to me from the post above) it could be for many reasons, and one of them is because it may need a full service. It could also simply need to be adjusted. Timekeeping is very poor indicator of the need for service actually.

    For the watch you bought with a broken mainspring, opening it up to visually inspect it would have told them nothing about the mainspring. You can't see the mainspring unless you full disassemble the movement, and open the mainspring barrel:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see there are a few parts that have to be removed to get to the barrel - the entire movement basically has to come apart:

    [​IMG]

    Of course that is no excuse for selling a watch with a broken spring, and there is a very easy way of telling if the mainspring on a Speedy Pro is broken - if it does not come to a stop when winding it, the spring is broken. No opening of the case required.

    Cheers, Al
  19. KatGirl

    KatGirl

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    "Of course that is no excuse for selling a watch with a broken spring, and there is a very easy way of telling if the mainspring on a Speedy Pro is broken - if it does not come to a stop when winding it, the spring is broken. No opening of the case required."

    That was my clue. ;) Thanks for the info, Al. When I buy pre-loved pieces now, I make sure they've been recently serviced, and ask for documentation.
  20. k.lange

    k.lange

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    The Speedy I own is reference 3570.50.

    I decided yesterday to go back to the AD and talk with them more about the watch running fast and to get it buffed as it will be a little while until I will have the Polywatch.

    I was able to speak with one of their watch repair specialists who is WOSTEP certified. I told him about my concern that the watch was only briefly looked at to ensure it runs and then put out for sale. He told me that what they actually do is put the watch through a number of tests to ensure that the watch is in good shape including pressure tests. And that the watch is thoroughly inspected. He told me that that it is similar to a used car that goes through a certification process at a dealership.

    While I would still prefer having actual documentation of the work that was done I feel better after talking at length with one of their repair specialists. Instead of being defensive as the salesperson was when I was there last time he was very friendly and helpful. He listened to all of my questions and took the time to explain all of the variables that affect a watch's accuracy.

    Al - I would appreciate any comments and insight you can provide.

    I asked to have my watch tested again. It had been wound about five hours before the first test. Here are the results:

    [​IMG]

    I told him that the watch normally sat with the crown up during the night. He showed me how to read the test results and how they showed how in that position it is running fast.

    He wound the watch fully and then tested it again. Here are the results:

    [​IMG]

    Winding the watch improved the delta and also slowed down the gain in the crown up position.

    His advice to me was to have the watch sit in the crown down position at night. He said that this would help keep the watch from gaining a lot of time.

    He also said that I should keep an eye on its performance and if is still running fast I can bring it in and he can regulate it.

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