PAM 002 Servicing

Discussion in 'Panerai Watches' started by Archer, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. Archer

    Archer

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    So I've shown the servicing of a vintage Rolex and a vintage Omega, so I thought I would show a modern watch this time. Richemont group unfortunately does not sell parts to independent watchmakers, so sometimes servicing watches made by companies in this group can be a challenge. Fortunately in the case of Panerai, many of these watches use movements made by ETA and the typical parts needed to do a routine service are readily available. Here is a PAM 002 that was sent to me recently for a full service, with the major complaint being that the watch would lose time randomly. It would run fine for a while then suddenly lose 30 minutes.

    So whenever I get a complaint like this, I like to do some checks on the watch before I begin. Here I have fully wound the watch and checked it in 6 positions:

    [​IMG]

    A closer look reveals the opposite of the complaint - this watch is averaging almost 30 seconds fast per day:

    [​IMG]

    In addition, the number for the Delta, which is the difference between the fastest and slowest positions, is a big large. All of this will be dealt with during the service, and this information pretty much confirms my suspicion regarding the cause of the time loss - a loose cannon pinion.

    Here I prepare for the servicing:

    [​IMG]

    First step is to remove the crown lock device:

    [​IMG]

    I select the correct die from the Panerai set:

    [​IMG]

    The case is opened:

    [​IMG]

    Back to the bench now, and you can see the ETA 6497-2 movement inside:

    [​IMG]

    Here the movement has been removed from the case:

    [​IMG]

    Here I have placed plastic over the dial so it is protected while I use the hand levers to remove the hands:

    [​IMG]

    Here the dial has been removed:

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to skip a lot of the disassembly, because it's pretty much the reverse of the assembly, but here it is after all the parts have been removed from the movement, and the balance has been placed back on with the cap jewels removed to protect everything in the cleaning machine:

    [​IMG]

    Here is the old mainspring in the barrel - I have serviced several manual wind versions with this movement that ended up with broken mainsprings but this one is intact:

    [​IMG]

    Here the parts are sorted by function in the storage trays:

    [​IMG]

    Here they are in the baskets ready for the cleaning machine:

    [​IMG]

    Baskets are mounted in the RM-90:

    [​IMG]

    So after the cleaning is done, one of the first jobs I do is to lubricate the cap jewels, and mount them back on the movement. I then can view the balance spring from all sides and check it for flatness and roundness. I use the #5 tweezers and the ETACHRON tool to also tweak the centering and the spacing of the regulating pins:

    [​IMG]

    Next I treat the escape wheel with Fix-O-Drop, also known as epilame. This helps keep oils from migrating on movement parts:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And here is the new barrel complete - I have found that seperate mainsprings for this movement are sometimes difficult to get in a timely manner, so in this case a barrel complete is much quicker to obtain:

    [​IMG]

    Now I start putting things back together - here the barrel and train wheels are on the main plate:

    [​IMG]

    Bridges installed:

    [​IMG]

    Next I check the end shakes on all the train wheels, and the center wheel has a bit too much. I use the Horia tool to adjust the jewel:

    [​IMG]

    Here I am moving the jewel down about 3/100ths of a mm:

    [​IMG]

    All good now, and back to assembling, lubricating as I install the parts:

    [​IMG]

    Here crown and ratchet wheels are both on:

    [​IMG]

    Now I assemble the winding/setting parts:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And here I confirm again that the cannon pinion is too loose. On this style it's an easy fix using the staking set, and a piece of brass rod:

    [​IMG]

    I slip the rod into the cannon pinion to make sure it does not crimp to much, and then lightly tap the punch to crimp it just a bit more:

    [​IMG]

    Now the tension feels right:

    [​IMG]

    Next I treat the jewels of the pallet fork with epilame using a dropper:

    [​IMG]

    Here the pallet fork is installed:

    [​IMG]

    I then let the watch run without any oil on the escapement. I do this to wear away a bit of the epilame on the escape wheel and pallet stones, and this creates a channel where the oil will sit:

    [​IMG]

    I remove the balance and prepare to oil the escapement. I do this with the watch stopped as I feel I have more control this way, but there are methods that have the watch running while you perform this task. The spot I will oil is at the tip of the red arrow, on the exit stone:

    [​IMG]

    Now I thought I would show this process in detail, so I got out the macro lens and extension tubes, and took some closer photos. Here I have placed a drop of Moebius 9415 on the exit stone - I always start with a very small drop and remember the surface of this stone measures about 0.35 mm X 0.45 mm or so:

    [​IMG]

    I then move the pallet fork back and forth, and the teeth of the escape wheel go by, and remove he oil. Once a few teeth have gone by, I place another drop and repeat the process. I keep doing this until I have gone around the escape wheel one complete revolution. I then stop adding oil, and simply move the pallet fork to run the escape wheel around several times to distribute the oil evenly before doing a check. I then watch the teeth go by the exit stone, and if I have the amount of oil correct, when the tooth is about 1/2 way up the stone, a "wedge" of oil will appear between the stone and the tooth as shown here:

    [​IMG]

    This process is pretty easy on a watch like this, but on a small ladies watch, it requires a steady hand.

    Now the watch is back running and on the demagnetizer:

    [​IMG]

    Back on the timing machine to check the timing in 6 positions:

    [​IMG]

    The results are much improved over where we started. The Delta is under 10 seconds, and the rate will be adjusted to be slightly positive:

    [​IMG]

    So now assembly time - here the hour wheel and dial washer have been installed:

    [​IMG]

    Dial is on:

    [​IMG]

    Hand are pressed on:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now before I assemble the watch fully, I need to do some case work. The client didn't want any polishing done, but wanted the watch fully pressure tested. I start by installing a new case back gasket:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I remove the stem from the movement, and close the watch up without the movement at this stage:

    [​IMG]

    First I take the watch to the dry testing machine. This machine uses vacuum and pressure to test the watch by measuring the deflection of the case. I use the diver program that starts with a test a -0.7 bar vacuum, then performs a second test at a +10 bar pressure:

    [​IMG]

    Here the case passed this test fine:

    [​IMG]

    But this watch is rated to 300 m, so 30 bar, which is past the pressure that the dry machine can measure to. So now I head to the cleaning room where my cleaning machines and lathe are located. Here is also where I perform the wet testing:

    [​IMG]

    This machine is the Diver 125, and it can test watches to 125 bar. Testing the watch starts with putting it in the holder, placing that holder in the testing chamber, and filling the chamber with water:

    [​IMG]

    Next I close the chamber, and let the watch sit with no pressure for 30 minutes:

    [​IMG]

    I then increase the pressure to the rating of the case, plus 25%. So here the pressure is now 37.4 bar, or 375 meters:

    [​IMG]

    I leave the case at this pressure for one hour, then I lower the pressure and remove the case from the unit:

    [​IMG]

    It now gets dried off, and placed on a heating unit that will heat the case to 47 degrees C - this takes 30 minutes:

    [​IMG]

    After 30 minutes, I place a drop of room temperature water on the crystal, and leave it for one minute:

    [​IMG]

    After a minute, I wipe the water off the crystal, and use a loupe in strong light to check for any condensation on the underside of the crystal, which would indicate a failed test. This case passed fine:

    [​IMG]

    So next I take the case to the bench, and install the movement:

    [​IMG]

    Here I adjust the rate the final time:

    [​IMG]

    Casing the watch:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now the watch is put through the final timing checks. This involves checking the watch as it sits in various positions for several 24 hour periods. One test I use if the final test winder. Although this watch does not wind automatically, this test winder simulates the various positions the watch will be in on someone's wrist:

    [​IMG]

    Once I'm sure the case does not need to be opened again, I perform all the pressure checks again, starting with the dry testing machine:

    [​IMG]

    Passed:

    [​IMG]

    Back to the wet tester:

    [​IMG]

    Into the testing chamber - note the time is just after 3:

    [​IMG]

    All locked down:

    [​IMG]

    30 minutes at no added pressure:

    [​IMG]

    Now up to 37.5 bar again:

    [​IMG]

    Note the time is now 3:35 approx.:

    [​IMG]

    Now at approx. 4:35:

    [​IMG]

    Watch is removed from the tank:

    [​IMG]

    Dried off and placed on the heater:

    [​IMG]

    30 minutes later the water drop is placed:

    [​IMG]

    And one minute after the drop is wiped away, and again the watch passes fine:

    [​IMG]

    This concludes the servicing of this PAM 002. I really hope you enjoyed seeing how this is done.

    Thanks again.

    Cheers, Al
  2. Baco Noir

    Baco Noir

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    Just amazing Al. You have some great skills and I think you for sharing this with us. This is something we'd be unlikely to see in a lifetime without your posts. :thumbsup:
  3. SLRdude

    SLRdude

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    Agreed.
    Very very interesting and amazing how stock the eta movement appears. It makes me wonder where the extra 4000 dollars goes.
  4. Erwin

    Erwin

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    Amazing detailed repair!:thumbsup:Very impressive equipments:worship:! Thanks for sharing!:cheers:
  5. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    What an amazing thread! You had me mesmerized over here! :worship: :worship:
  6. SPACE-DWELLER

    SPACE-DWELLER

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    Fantastic post, Al! :worship: :worship:

    Thanks for sharing your expertice and knowledge! :thumbsup:
  7. r-l-x

    r-l-x

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    :goodpost: Al
  8. artravel

    artravel

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    Thanks for sharing!!!:thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Impressive post!!!
    Made me want to keep my 002!!!!
  9. Archer

    Archer

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    Well, the level of finishing varies on these watches, and in this case there wasn't much extra done to the train side of the movement. The dial side has full perlage though. Here is a shot of a 112 I serviced last year with everything removed from the plates. You can see that even when they do finish the train side, they only do it where the plates aren't...of course this is the style with the newer bridge shapes.

    [​IMG]

    Here are a couple of shots of a 196 I did last year (ETA 7753)....much more finishing here than on the manual wind watches I've done from Panerai...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, glad you all enoyed the post.

    Cheers, Al
  10. SLRdude

    SLRdude

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    Thanks Archer!

    Any way you can move some of your pictorials from WWF here?

    I'll gladly move them for you if you want but I would rather have them show your name than mine. :)
  11. Goldbug

    Goldbug

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    Wow, that was just fantastic. I don't believe I've read as detailed a report as such before and enjoyed every minute of it. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and pictures.



    John
  12. RW16610

    RW16610

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    Wow, like all the others I was blown away and REALLY enjoyed looking at this :goodpost: :goodpost: :goodpost: :goodpost: :goodpost: Hope to see you make many more of these! By the way, what part of Canada are you in?
  13. SSD

    SSD

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    Brilliant, I couldn't take my eyes off this until I read the whole thing. Amazing!
  14. Watchreport DE

    Watchreport DE

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    Great stuff Al!
    I have a question about Panerai:
    How many gaskets do they use on a base model at the crown!?
    I could not find out so far! Do they "just" use a single gasket in the crown or do they also have gaskets in the tube?
    Do you have a pic of the tube or crow gasket????

    Thank you!
  15. SPACE-DWELLER

    SPACE-DWELLER

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    It seems that the crown has two seals, Marcus:

    Crown

    And here's the patent drawing:

    [​IMG]
  16. Archer

    Archer

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    Sorry - no photos but there are 2 seals. One is on the inside of the case tube, and seals around the shaft of the crown. The other is located in the crown itself, and seals on a lip on the case when the lever is closed. The seal in the case tube provides some water resistance with the lever open.

    Cheers, Al
  17. Watchreport DE

    Watchreport DE

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    Thank you Al ! You made my day :thumbsup: I now own a 372 but I am not convinced about the shown Panerai quality for this money.
  18. colemanitis

    colemanitis

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    What are your concerns, Marcus? From the outside Panerai watches are very simple. Is it the simplicity that's bothering you, or are you seeing QC issues?
  19. Rigsby

    Rigsby

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    I'm really liking the Pam :thumbsup:
  20. Watchreport DE

    Watchreport DE

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    I would call Panerai a fashion watch (more or less) high end prices for average watchmaking skills and technics.
    It´s just a high end luxury thing. Why ? Because it´s sold for it´s look, name and image.
    A Rolex has a value a Pam is sold for other reason, don´t get me wrong I love my 372 but a Sub is a much better and much cheaper watch.
    But I don´t care, the 372 looks great!

    just my 0,02 $